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Remembering Wayman Tisdale
Articles


On Friday, May 15, 2009, Wayman Tisdale passed away at the age of 44 after a courageous two year battle with bone cancer.

On the Court

Tisdale

Tisdale was selected 2nd overall in the 1985 NBA draft by the Indiana Pacers. His 12 year NBA career also included time with the Sacramento Kings and Phoenix Suns. During that time he averaged 15.3 points and 6.1 rebounds per game. Tisdale was a reliable low post scorer and regarded as a great teammate and solid competitor. His best days were his early years with Sacramento. He was an excellent fit for former coach Dick Motta’s forward oriented offense.

The Oklahoma alum’s collegiate career is as impressive as it gets. Tisdale was a three time Big Eight Player of the Year and the first in college basketball history to be named first team all American in his freshman, sophomore and junior seasons. He left school for the NBA after his junior season and still holds Oklahoma’s record for all time points and rebounds. His college career was so profound that it propelled him into the College Basketball Hall of Fame 2009.

Off the Court

Tisdale’s story is one example of several important reasons I founded The Draft Review. It’s obviously vital to chronicle players’ careers with background information and statistics, yet I find it as equally important to understand who the players are on a personal level and how success or tragedy shaped their lives.

About two years ago I approached Tisdale for an interview. He politely responded by telling me that he wasn’t feeling well and he would be back in touch after things improved. It wasn’t until after this quick email exchange that I learned of Tisdale’s fight with cancer and the chemotherapy he had recent undergone. This brought back memories of a family member who had also undergone chemo and reminded me of the challenges involved in recovering from this difficult procedure.

 
Historically Speaking: Early Entry International Firsts
Articles

NBA draft history is in the making yet again as the early entry list boasts Kazakhstani, Hungarian and Estonian natives for the first time ever. But do these trailblazers seriously have an honest shot at a draft night selection? Let's take a closer look Anton Ponomarev, Adam Hanga, and Tanel Kurbas.

Anton Ponomarev

Borat put Kazakhstan on the map and Anton Ponomarev is right behind him. The 6-foot-9 combo forward is known throughout Asia as the “Asian Nowitzki” for his ability to put the ball on the floor and shoot off the dribble. While he still has a way to go to gain full confidence in this lofty comparison, his young age of 20 gives him a window of opportunity to develop.

Ponomarev
If there is anything that hinders his draft stock it's the poor competition he plays against. Kazakhstan’s basketball league, while much improved, is a long ways from its Asian cousin China. Ponomarev may also be viewed as the Ricky Rubio of the Asian basketball community because he's played professionally since the ripe age of 16. Non-scout observers, such as ESPN's Chad Ford, have said he is unlikely to be drafted, but it's pretty obvious that Ford has never seen Ponomarev play.

Make no mistake, the NBA is aware of this young star. In 2005, current Thunder GM Sam Presti, while part of San Antonio Spurs front office staff, received tape on Ponomarev. Many close to the situation hope that he will move forward and progress with his basketball career by playing in China’s top professional league, the CBA. It's highly unlikely that he will stay in the draft with one more year of eligibility remaining until his draft class is automatically enrolled. Sadly, it has been rumored that the Kazakhstan league is doing everything in its power to keep him from moving.

Anton Ponomarev is a rising talent that shows; anyone who disagrees does not possess the scouts' eye. Hopefully Ponomarev can increase his upper body strength and, most importantly, meet up against better competition by playing in China.

Adam Hanga


Hungary enters the early entry list with Adam Hanga, an unusual nominee. When you look at the silky 6-7 Hungarian who favors Tony Parker in appearance, you may not believe that he's Hungarian. But Hanga is the son of a Hungarian mother and an African father, and is the most talented player in Hungarian basketball.

Hanga
Hanga isn't well known to the masses. I've been following him since he was 11 years-old when a contact of mine put his name on a list of who he considered the top international youth prospects. Since this time Hanga has slowly put together his game, but not without some pitfalls.

He's a tremendous athlete, but his perimeter shooting and defense could stand improvement. The NBA is a long shot at the moment as his draft class is two years away. By 2011 his window of opportunity could be much larger. Much like Ponomarev, Hanga’s poor competition level makes him suspect to onlookers. He's labeled by some as a poor mans Nicholas Batum.

While in France, Batum suffered the same issues as Hanga. He appeared too passive and out of focus during stretches of games. Hanga shows promise, but if he is to secure himself in the draft and follow fellow Hungarian and former free agent Kornel David to the NBA, he needs to demonstrate growth as a player. With Hanga's ball handling, explosiveness, and feel for the game he has the potential for a successful pro career. The future is in his hands.

Tanel Kurbas

Tanel Kurbas is making the jump to the NBA, but where the hell is Estonia? It's located right above Latvia by the Baltic Sea and, like Latvia, was one of the 15 countries to claim independence after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

Kurbas is a solid blend of athleticism and fundamentals. He does many things well, but doesn't really stand out in a particular area. Offensively, Kurbas shows promise, but isn’t a solid ball handler or perimeter shooter. He moves well without the ball, but is limited offensively depending on where he is on the floor. He's shown the ability to defend at a solid level, which could be the primary staple of his game. Kurbas getting drafted is a serious long shot. He probably declared at the urging of his agent. In 2010 he will be automatically eligible for the draft, but as his 1988 class expires, so will Tanel's hope for a draft selection. For the fact checkers, yes, Estonia does have draftee Martin Muursepp, but he was automatically eligible, not an early entry draftee.

With all the complaining about the number of early entries I think it’s one of the things that makes the draft a great event. On the international level there are players that can just jump into your TV screen and make you say, "who's that"?

A perfect example of this is Ejike Ugboaja from Nigeria, who declared for the 2006 NBA draft with little fanfare. The Cleveland Cavaliers selected the power forward in the second round, 55th pick overall. Only a small handful of people knew who he was on draft night. With any luck maybe one of these three could be next. Only this time you will know exactly who they are! See you on draft night.
 
Remembering Glen "Gondo" Gondrezick
Articles

On Monday, April 27, 2009, Glen "Gondo" Gondrezick passed away at the age of 53 due to complications from a heart transplant he underwent in September 2008.

Gondo
Gondrezick was selected 26th overall in the 1977 NBA Draft by the New York Knicks. He had a solid 6-year NBA career with the Knicks and Denver Nuggets before heading off to Italy for two years. The Colorado native was a fan favorite while playing for his hometown Denver team. Gondrezick wasn't known as a player of tremendous athletic talent, but he more than made up for this with toughness and an all out aggressive style of play.

The UNLV alum was a key member in their first Final Four appearance in 1977. Gondrezick was one of the players Jerry Tarkanian signed during his inaugural coaching season at UNLV. In Gondrezick's four years at UNLV Tarkanian had an 86% winning average. One of the most memorable wins came against San Francisco College, who was the number one team in the land. The win firmly cemented UNLV as an up and coming power on the college basketball landscape. Gondrezick's play was so instrumental that his jersey was retired by the school in 1997. He is currently ranked 16th on the school's all-time scoring list with 1,311 points and ninth with 831 career rebounds.

After leaving pro basketball for good Gondrezick went on to become the color commentator for UNLV basketball the past 17 years. In 2000 he learned that he had congenital heart disease, which slowly worsened until his heart only pumped at 9% capacity.

Glen Gondrezick is remembered by his family as a loving father and one of best practical jokers on or off the court. He is survived by his sons Travis and Kelan, and daughter his Britt.

The Draft Review remembers Glen Gondrezick. View his historical draft profile.
 
Where's the Hate?
Articles

The Spanish sensation, Ricky Rubio, has declared for the draft. And it's no surprise. This 18 year-old phenom has played, in arguably, one of the world's toughest basketball leagues since the tender age of 15 and evolved into one of the best in the world at his position. NBA teams clamored to follow the "La Pistola" and are jocking him like he's an eighties heartthrob. So they got their wish. Rubio is in the draft. But where's the media hate?

Some of us became quite cynical and frustrated by the NBA's bargaining agreement, as it ended the ability for traditional high school players to pursue an NBA contract. For the most part the rule has definitely been a source of great success. After all, watching Derrick Rose, Michael Beasley, Greg Oden and Kevin Durant dominate the college game has been favorable for the league. It gives free, widespread marketing hype to upcoming star players and revitalized the excitement of the NBA draft.

This has worked tremendously and no one can argue its effectiveness, but what bothers me is the international market's lack of bad press and scrutiny. Few, if any, sports writers talk about how bad foreign players are, like Johan Petro, Pavel Podkolzin, Yaroslav Korolev, or Nikoloz Tskitishvili to name a few. All of these guys could have been in high school when they were drafted.

Consider Darko Milicic who is esteemed as serviceable while Kwame Brown is viewed as a complete disgrace. When you get right down to it they're both complete busts, but Milicic, the international guy, has somehow escaped the deeper fathoms of Bust-topia. Why?

And now the conversation has turned to John Wall possibly entering the draft as a fifth year high school player. Wall says all the right things in interviews because he's smart. He knows if he declares or even mentions that he is thinking about declaring there will be an orgy of hack writers talking about how bad of a pro he will be and what he is missing by not going to college. Meanwhile, international players have a free pass to openly talk about whatever they want because they never get any flack for it.

So Rubio is in the 2009 NBA draft. And I wonder where is the hate is, because if an American high school player declares it will be a Hater's Ball.
 
Phenom Wasteland
Articles

The Phenom Wasteland
It is a place desolate and barren where stories of abandoned phenom glory dwells. And I visited this dejected land in all its gloom to bring back the tales of former recruits who cast off their glory and squandered their talent to the Phenom Wastelands.

Clark Francis, Bob Gibbons, and Dave Telep are just a few of the gurus who make a living watching young men play basketball. They do a solid job of evaluating talent in the difficult and tedious task of grading and ranking 500-800 players each season. They have nailed quite a few prospects but there have also been some significant misses. So how do recruiting gurus go wrong when it comes to a top 25 national recruit who goes bust?

My visit to the Wasteland revealed that it's not what about what happens when the game is played. Rather, it is a lethal dose of bad luck, unfounded player hype, or poor decisions off the court.

It's easy to recall obvious Wasteland dwellers like Schea Cotton, Lenny Cooke, Jerod Ward, Felipe Lopez and Ronnie Fields. But this place also holds the obscure stories of five former top recruits who met with unpredictable and heartbreaking circumstances that derailed their journey to the NBA.
 
When They Were Giants: Long Island University
Articles

Like many who watch college basketball, fans naturally tend to lean toward supporting a powerhouse school or one of the best locally. Nowadays the typical NCAA tournament features UCLA blowing out a lower level college from an average conference. But if you turn back the clock 50 or 60 years neither UCLA, North Carolina, Louisville and many others in today's power conferences could stand toe to toe with yesterday's giants now fallen from grace.

Long Island University was easily one of the most dominant teams of the mid-thirties, forties and very early fifties that pioneered the game with an African American as its star player and a team loaded with Jewish talent. But a point shaving scandal would cause this giant's downfall.
 
Honorable Draftee: The Case for Ben "Benji" Wilson
Articles

The Case for Ben "Benji" Wilson

At the start of the 1983-84 basketball season one thing was clear - Lowell Hamilton was not only Chicago’s top player but one of the nation's top 20 prospects in the 1985 recruiting class. But Ben Wilson would soon surpass Hamilton's glory by becoming Chicago's first to be named the nation’s top recruit.

You can't really blame anyone for sleeping on Wilson. It was only two years prior when he played junior varsity as a freshman, and while he had a solid sophomore year his numbers were modest. Yet it was during this time that things began to take shape for the 6-8 small forward. He adjusted into his quickly growing body while retaining passing and ball handling ability from his days as a guard. Word soon got out about the budding talent and the crazed basketball city of Chicago quickly embraced its newfound native son.

Wilson did not disappoint as he led Simeon High to the state championship with a 30-1 record and success did not stop there. He was invited to attend the prestigious Nike All-American camp where his versatility and feel for the game led many recruiting observers and head coaches to label Wilson the top player in the nation.

Heading into his senior year Wilson was on top of the basketball world. Simeon was a lock to repeat as State champs with Wilson, which became even more assured when he convinced his childhood friend and future NBA player, Nick Anderson, to transfer from Prosser High School.

Illinois, DePaul, and Indiana waited with baited breath to hear if Wilson would select their program. At 17 years-old he was also a new father to a baby boy. His future seemed all but set - just a few years in college before cashing in on the NBA.

The Problem

It was a warm November day; the kind that reminds you of spring. Wilson was just a few days from playing the first game of his much anticipated senior year. He and his high school sweetheart, Jetun Rush, decided to take a walk a few blocks from Simeon's campus. No one would have guessed that the events to unfold on this beautiful day would result in Wilson's murder.

 
Mock Draft Update: 1/22/09
Articles
The Draft Board has been updated!
 
Robert Dozier
NBA PLAYERS
Player Background
By Matthew Maurer
1/6/09

Dozier's rise in basketball came rather late. It was at an age when top prospects are discovered before they finish the 8th grade. He was initially more interested in baseball than hoops but his 6-inch growth spurt after freshmen year led him to rethink his athletic options.

Dozier's sophomore year was nothing more than an experiment as his new found body lacked coordination, but by the time he entered junior year the clumsiness that plagued him was a thing of the past. His tremendous AAU play during the Kingwood Classic really opened up college coaches eyes around the nation, including head coach John Calipari who offered him a scholarship which Dozier immediately accepted. But with the explosion of his stock heading into senior year Dozier decided to re-open his recruitment because he felt he rushed things.

The top 100 prospect committed to the University of Georgia with their offer of playing time. After graduating from Lithonia High School, Georgia's admissions flagged Dozier's SAT because of it's significantly high score. He re-took the test only to score dramatically lower. With his academics out of order he made his way to Laurinburg Prep where he played an integral part in the school's perfect 40-0 record and their 2005 prep national championship. Dozier averaged 14.4 points and 7.5 rebounds on a loaded squad that featured fellow Memphis teammates Antonio Anderson and Shawne Williams (Dallas Mavericks).

In the end Dozier re-committed to Memphis partly because of his relationship with the coaching staff but primarily due to the school's location close to family. Although Dozier is not labeled a troublemaker he's had his share of lumps with Calipari who, despite this, remains loyal to Dozier but stresses that the senior must be dedicated to the weight room this season.

BIOGRAPHY If you have additional information you would like to contribute to any player profile (i.e. missing stats, biography), please click here. Please be aware that you must have a verifiable source.

Statistics

SEASONS

GP

FG%

3PT%

FT%

SPG

BPG

RPG

APG

PPG

2005-06 Memphis

37

40.4

22.2

75.0

0.6

1.1

5.5

0.6

5.6

2006-07 Memphis

37

47.1

29.3

63.4

0.9

1.5

6.2

1.1

9.6

2007-08 Memphis

37

44.0

30.3

67.5

1.1

1.8

6.8

1.1

9.2

2008-09 Memphis

37

51.9

37.5

72.1

1.3

1.6

7.5

1.4

12.9

DIV I Totals

148

45.9

29.8

69.5

1.0

1.5

6.5

1.1

9.3

 

 
Roundball Rant: Eric Snow, Hansbrough, and 1991 UNLV vs. Arkansas
Articles

By Matthew Maurer

I recently watched NBA TV’s “NBA Game Time” hosted by Marc Fein and former
Eric Snow with wife DeShawn
NBA ball player Eric Snow. Somebody please press the play button in Snow’s brain because he's stuck on pause. He's dull, monotone, and has the personality of a comatose snail. My hyperactive son filled up on cookies and Kool-Aid begs me for a nap whenever he sees Snow on the tube. This guy doesn’t give you any kind of insider perspective like Steve Smith and Gary Payton. Nor does he talk with any passion and zest like Chris Webber. Listening to Snow is the equivalent of Ben Stein in the movie Ferris Bueller's Day Off..."Bueller? Bueller? Anyone?” I think Snow's wife, DeShawn, is part of the problem. She's got a reality gig on Bravo’s Real Housewives of Atlanta and let’s just say this woman is special like having a hole in head. Every five minutes she talks about how elite she and her family are (no lie). Dealing with that 24/7 probably leaves Snow with very little left in the tank for the job. Maybe DeShawn brainwashed Snow into thinking he's so extremely elite that all he has to do is show up at the studio, look good in his tailor-made suit and viewers will be satisfied. Who knows. But to Snow’s credit he is capable of saying intelligent things and always remains professional and classy, however, in the field he's chosen he needs a quick study course on how to engage viewers. (If DeShawn reads this she'll probably say I'm jealous of her elite-ness.)

Tyler Hansbrough may just be the most under appreciated player in the history of college basketball. But maybe it’s partly his own fault. He doesn’t have that jerk swagger with the "yeah I know I’m a star" grin, and athletically he lacks that one real play that defines him as a SportsCenter highlight. For Hansbrough his high point is battling through a barrage of bodies while keeping his balance for the and-one foul. And he’s white. I know, I know, race supposedly has nothing to do with basketball but in the minds of scouts and media I'm not so sure. How many times have you heard a white player complimented on his sheer "will" and how "he out works everyone"? People in the media, please, for the love of all that is right with the game stop using these tired clichés. If I was to take a drink every time an announcer or color commentator said these worn out words I'd have to be treated for alcohol poisoning. To further compound the issues some of the geniuses in the scouting world feel that Hansbrough doesn’t have first round talent. What games are you guys watching? Rafael Araujo, Kris Humphries, Julius Hodge and Shelden Williams are all draft busts that went in the top 20 of the first round, yet certain scouts project Hansbrough in the 20-25 range. How is this when the players mentioned did less? These scouts are lucky they live in the sports world where accountability is a non-factor or else they'd be in the unemployment line.

I have some old school games that I had the opportunity to watch over the holiday. 1991 UNLV versus Arkansas. Man, what a game. We're talking about nine NBA draft picks with seven of them in the first round! Arkansas was armed with Todd Day, Oliver Miller, Isaiah Morris, and Lee Mayberry. Mighty UNLV had Larry
Anderson Hunt
Johnson
, Stacey Augmon, Greg Anthony, Elmore Spencer, George Ackles and Anderson Hunt. Hunt was such a special player. I know this guy’s name is synonymous with why you shouldn’t leave school early, but his story is more complicated than that. Anderson Hunt is in the rare company of players who were probably ahead of their time. Later that season he declared for the 1991 NBA draft as a junior and left with most of his teammates. As the story goes he went undrafted and was later cut by the Washington Bullets (Wizards) and Boston Celtics. Many league execs said later on that Hunt wasn’t drafted due to his height, which is true. He was 6-1 to 6-2, but how much of this had to do with the league environment? If you look at the league’s shooting guards at that time most starters were in the 6-5 to 6-7 range. Today it's a different story. Ben Gordon, Allen Iverson, Eric Gordon, Eddie House and Shannon Brown to name a few all drop below what would have been the shooting guard standard in the NBA of the early nineties. Hunt's great defense, sweet shooting stroke and athleticism would have been huge assets in today’s market. Even vaunted NBA scout Ryan Blake said in an ESPN story that Hunt’s only problem at the time wasn’t talent, but height. He was “a 6-2 shooting guard that needed to play point in the NBA," said Blake. "Kenny Anderson came out that year. [Execs] are going to take guys that have more of an upside, that can come in and help that position (point guard) right away. It all came down to that."

Getting back to the game, final score was 112-105, UNLV.

 
Sam Young
NBA PLAYERS
Player Background
By Matthew Maurer
12/31/08

Young first caused heads to turn the summer of 2004 when he played AAU in the Las Vegas Showcase. His intensity, ability to score, and sheer athleticism made coaches take notice.

At Friendly High School in Maryland Young's team needed his size desperately, which often kept him away from the perimeter. Young topped off his senior year with a state title but academic problems prevented him from entering college. He spent a prep year at Hargrave Military Academy which proved to be an excellent move, as he became Scout.com's National Prep School Player of the Year after averaging 23 points and 11 rebounds per game. Although Young's recruiting was limited due to being undersized at power forward, his play catapulted him to a top 75 national ranking and garnered scholarship offers from Virginia Tech, Penn State, and Miami (FL) before he committed to Pittsburgh under head coach Jamie Dixon.

Over the past three years Young has gone from an undersized power forward with few fundamentals to a legitimate small forward prospect. His rise actually led some to speculate his early entry into 2008 NBA draft but he quickly informed everyone that he was staying for his final year. The winner of the Big East Conference's Most Improved Player of the Year award could finish his career among Pittsburgh's top 10 scorers depending upon his senior year performance.


Premium Historical Comparison: Chris Morris
Substandard Historical Comparison: Joey Graham

Strengths:
• High Flyer
• NBA Ready body
• Tremendous Finisher
• Superior Athlete
• Long arms
• Work Ethic
• Perimeter Defense
• Solid Rebounder
• Absorbs contact on finish
• Impressive physical tools
• Effective shooter
Weaknesses:
• Court vision
• Ball handling skills
• Upside
• Shooting off dribble
• 1st step
• Settles for jumpers
BIOGRAPHY If you have additional information you would like to contribute to any player profile (i.e. missing stats, biography), please click here. Please be aware that you must have a verifiable source.

Statistics

SEASONS

GP

FG%

3PT%

FT%

SPG

BPG

RPG

APG

PPG

2005-06 Pittsburgh

33

52.1

19.0

69.3

0.7

0.6

4.4

0.8

7.9

2006-07 Pittsburgh

37

45.8

31.0

59.7

0.6

0.5

3.0

0.7

7.2

2007-08 Pittsburgh

37

50.3

38.3

69.0

1.1

1.1

6.3

1.2

18.1

2008-09 Pittsburgh

36

50.2

37.2

74.0

1.0

0.8

6.3

1.1

19.2

DIV I Totals

143

49.5

31.7

67.9

0.9

0.8

5.0

1.0

13.2

 

 

 
Norm Cook: The Insanity of Life
Articles

If you've kept up with recent basketball news you know that Norm Cook, the once great Kansas player, passed away on Monday December 22, 2008. But what you probably won’t read about is the tragedy that played out for more than half his life.

At a very young age Cook witnessed his father gunned down by violent Chicago gangs. The violence then continued as gangs constantly harassed Cook before he moved to Lincoln and found peace on the basketball courts. It was here that he became a Lincoln High legend, leading them to the quarterfinals of the Illinois state tournament.

The move not only proved positive for Norm but also benefited the rest of the Cook family as his siblings Steve, Joe, and Stacey were sensational athletes. Joe went on to play basketball for Duke University and Stacey finished second in the 440 yard dash to future Olympian Jackie Joyner-Kersee. Norm continued his basketball career playing for the University of Kansas and head coach Ted Owens. At an age when freshmen don't typically contribute Cook was immediately inserted into the starting lineup on a team that would eventually make the Final Four. After three years he was the first modern athlete in Kansas’ illustrious program to leave school early for the NBA. The All-Big 8 conference was selected by the Boston Celtics in the 1976 NBA draft before serious problems started.

 
Wait, Whose 12-0?
Articles

Submitted by Ben Chew, TDR Fan Blog

Alright everyone, here is a pop quiz for all of you. There are currently two teams that are ranked in the top 25 who have 12-0 records. Who are the two?

For all you Big East fans, I give you that Pittsburgh is 12-0. Then who is the other team? Most people would probably figure that it's someone from the ACC and that's right. Is it North Carolina? Wake Forest? Duke?

Nope, it's the Clemson Tigers. Albeit, many of you are probably saying that they haven't beat anyone and that might be rightfully so. However, they did beat Miami by a large margin and Illinois in the Big Ten/ACC Challenge if that matters to anyone.

I'm not saying that Clemson is a world-beater by any stretch of the imagination but looking at their line-up it's not hard to be impressed. They have one of the best shooters in all of college basketball with Terrence Oglesby and do all starter KC Rivers. This success shouldn't come as a surprise since this Clemson team was the runner up in the ACC tournament to North Carolina.

This could arguably be the best team that Clemson has had since the 1979-80 season when the team was lead under head coach Bill Foster. That team was lead by Larry Nance and reached the elite eight in the NCAA tournament. Don't be surprised if the success from this year's team matches or surpasses the team of 1980. Just start paying attention to them.

 
Ahmad Nivins
NBA PLAYERS

Player Background
By Matthew Maurer
12/20/08

Nivins demonstrated great aptitude for the game of baseball growing up and dreamed of making it big in the major league. He perceived basketball as nothing more than a recreational sport to engage in after baseball season's end. That is until his high school freshman year when he decided to give basketball a try due in large part to a growth spurt and the support of his father. This made the transition to hoops a natural progression.

With his first year of organized ball under his belt Nivins proved to be a non-factor, but in his sophomore year he showed great promise. Due to luke warm competition Nivins soon transferred to basketball powerhouse St. Anthony where he learned under the tutelage of Coach Hurley. The move paid off as his play the following year at the ABCD camp earned the eyes of local schools Rutgers and Seton Hall. Before the start of his senior season Nivins ended his recruitment after an enjoyable visit to St. Joseph's sealed the deal. Nivins stated that head coach Phil Martelli made him feel very comfortable. The top 150 prospect averaged 15 points, 10 rebounds and 5 blocks per game before bowing out of the state tournament against rival high school St. Patrick's. Upon entering St. Joseph's Nivins slowly developed into a dependable low post threat after a modest freshman year where he earned all-rookie honors in the Atlantic-10 conference. His biggest obstacle is to develop a better presence on the boards and keep his intensity level and focus consistent.

BIOGRAPHY If you have additional information you would like to contribute to any player profile (i.e. missing stats, biography), please click here. Please be aware that you must have a verifiable source.

Statistics

SEASONS

GP

FG%

3PT%

FT%

SPG

BPG

RPG

APG

PPG

2005-06 St. Joseph's

30

61.3

00.0

70.6

0.4

1.3

  5.0

0.3

 6.1

2006-07 St. Joseph's

31

63.1

00.0

67.8

1.0

1.0

  7.6

0.4

16.6

2007-08 St. Joseph's

33

64.7

---

74.1

0.7

1.2

  5.8

0.5

14.4

2008-09 St. Joseph's

32

61.2

00.0

78.7

0.8

1.8

11.8

1.0

19.2

DIV I Totals

126

62.6

00.0

72.9

0.7

1.3

  7.6

0.6

14.2

 
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